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HI celebrates it's 35th anniversary!

 

 

 

 

35 years HI | Handicap International

Since 1982, our teams have been working every day to change the lives of disabled and vulnerable people. 35 years later, it is this same devotion that drives us and pushes us to work ever harder to help those who need it most.

 

 

Thank you to all those who have encouraged us, over the years, and who continue to do so!

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East Ethiopia: the forgotten crisis
© HI

East Ethiopia: the forgotten crisis

The grazing regions of Oromia and Somali in southern and eastern Ethiopia have witnessed an escalation in inter-ethnic violence in recent months. Since last September, more than one million people have fled their villages and been displaced to hundreds of reception areas. HI is working to protect the most vulnerable individuals, primarily women and children. Fabrice Vandeputte, HI’s head of mission in Ethiopia, explains the causes of the crisis and how the organisation is responding to it.

A frightening increase in the number of victims of explosive weapons
(c) E. Fourt/HI

A frightening increase in the number of victims of explosive weapons

On the occasion of the International Day for Mine Awareness, HI is alarmed by the frightening increase in the number of civilian victims of explosive weapons : 32,008 civilians were killed or injured by explosive weapons in 2016 (out of a total of 45,624 victims), according to Action on Armed Violence (AOAV). The toll looks even heavier for 2017, as civilians account for 90% of the victims of explosive weapons when they are used in populated areas. Landmine Monitor has recorded a dramatic increase in casualties of mine and explosive remnants over the past three years. Syria, Afghanistan, Libya, Ukraine and Yemen are among the main countries affected.

Bangladesh: Rohingya Refugees brace for rain and cyclones
© E.Pajot/ HI

Bangladesh: Rohingya Refugees brace for rain and cyclones

The largest refugee camp in the world is built on tree-stripped hills in a flood-prone area of southern Bangladesh. With annual rains expected to arrive in April and the threat of cyclones looming, HI staff in the camps are extremely concerned about the impact of flooding and landslides on the most vulnerable.