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Honoring #WomenHumanitarians

Protect vulnerable populations Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees
International

This World Humanitarian Day, we're putting a spotlight on the women humanitarians who dedicate their lives to making the world a better place. Women humanitarians with Humanity & Inclusion are committed to making the world a healthier, safer, happier, and more inclusive space for people with disabilities. And for that, we are incredibly grateful! Today, we're highlighting some of our inspiring colleagues from around the globe.

Wafa had her left leg broken during a bombing.

Wafa had her left leg broken during a bombing. | © Benoît Almeras/HI

Bharati in Nepal

 

Bharati, an HI physical therapist, does exercises with Nishan, a beneficiary in Nepal.

© PRASIIT STHAPIT / HI

Three years ago, Bharati left her hospital job and joined Humanity & Inclusion's community based rehabilitation center in Nepal. Today, she works with beneficiaries like Nishan (pictured above), where she provides physical therapy and orthopedic fittings, making it possible for him to stand tall.


Saud in Jordan

 

c_Benoit-Almeras_HI__Wafa_-an-HI-beneficary-in-Jordan-gives-Saud_-a-physical-therapist-with-HI-a-hug-square.jpg

© BENOIT ALMERAS / HI

Saud is a physical therapist who works with Syrian refugees in Jordan. Through rehabilitation exercises, she helps civilians who have been injured in conflict regain strength—both body and mind—so they can stand tall.


Yeiny in Colombia

 

c_JM-Vargas_HI__Yeiny_-a-deminer-with-Humanity-_-Inclusion-in-Colombia_-searches-for-UXO-in-a-highly-contiminated-area-square.jpg

© JM VARGAS / HI

Colombia's conflict zones are littered with mines. Yeiny, 26, is doing something about it. Working as a deminer with Humanity & Inclusion in the Andes Cordillera area, she is committed to clearing unexploded weapons leftover from war and keeping her community safe.


Grace in Kenya

 

Grace, a physical therapist with HI, helps a baby with rehab exercises in Kenya's Kakuma refugee camp.

© NEIL THOMAS / HI

Five years before this photo was taken, Grace, 23, was forced to flee South Sudan. Since then, she's been living in the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya. Humanity & Inclusion met Grace and trained her as a physical therapist. "I never want to do anything else again," she says with a smile. Today, she helps many children with disabilities and can financially support her six siblings. 

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Interview with Jean-Loup Gouot on the COVID-19 pandemic
© M. A. Islam / HI
Health Protect vulnerable populations Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees

Interview with Jean-Loup Gouot on the COVID-19 pandemic

Jean-Loup Gouot, Director of Humanity & Inclusion (HI) in Bangladesh, talks about the impact of COVID-19 in the country and outlines the risks of this epidemic, particularly for Rohingya refugees.

HI adapts its action to combat COVID-19 and protect the most vulnerable
© Quinn Neely / HI
Emergency Health Inclusion

HI adapts its action to combat COVID-19 and protect the most vulnerable

Our teams are making changes to the way they work in order to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in the field wherever possible. This includes reviewing their current response and implementing new projects to protect people from the virus and deal with the impact of the crisis, with a focus on people with disabilities, children, women, and isolated and older people.

COVID-19: Physical therapists help prevent the spread in vulnerable communities
© Quinn Neely / HI
Health Protect vulnerable populations Rehabilitation

COVID-19: Physical therapists help prevent the spread in vulnerable communities

Humanity & Inclusion’s teams are making changes to the way they work and assisting at-risk populations in response to the global spread of COVID-19. This will include providing local people with accessible, stay healthy messages, and offering access to physical therapists via WhatsApp. Our emergency rehabilitation expert Pauline Falipou explains: