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How to teach a child with disabilities in your class

Inclusion
Madagascar

A primary school teacher in the village of Ambodivoapaka in Madagascar, Relaxon has been trained by Handicap International to include children with disabilities in his lessons.

Relaxon in front of his classroom | © Handicap International

The questions teachers ask most often are: what approach should they adopt during lessons to take into account each child’s disabilities, and where should they place the child to best meet their specific needs? The training provided by HI gives teachers the basic tools they need to adapt their teaching accordingly.

“After my training, I was able to teach my two students with learning difficulties and take into account their disabilities. It changed my attitude towards each of my students and made me more aware of their specific needs. I now sit them in the best place according to their disability. For example, I seat a student with a visual impairment where I’m sure they can see the board and me.”

But the problem goes beyond adapting classes to children with disabilities. Parents also have a role to play. Disability is still not completely accepted in Madagascar. Parents find it hard to ask for help, so it’s up to the teacher to go and see them to talk about it, give them advice and, above all, persuade them that the school has a lot to offer their child, even if they’re not performing well, because schools are also a means to discover yourself, learn and overcome your disability.

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