Go to main content
 
 

It's fate

Kamel is Syrian. Last year, the 25-year-old was injured in a bombing raid. After a long stay in hospital, the young farmer is now living in the Zaatari camp in Jordan. Handicap International is helping him to recover from his injuries by teaching him how to adapt to his new life in a wheelchair.

Kamel_jordanie_echo

Kamel learns how to adapt to his new life in a weelchair | © E. Fourt / Handicap International

When you meet Kamel, the first thing you notice is his huge smile and communicative good nature. The wheelchair is a mere detail, both for the young Syrian and for those who meet him.  "With or without the wheelchair, I just get on with things," he explains happily. "I live the life I have been given, that's all. I'm not angry, I don't hate anything or anyone. I accept my fate. I'm just grateful for what God has decided for me."

Kamel has lived through five years of war, but nothing seems to dent his optimism. Not even when he lost the use of his legs, last year. "I was hit by a bomb. I immediately lost consciousness. I woke up at the hospital in Jordan. The doctors told me I had shell shrapnel between two vertebrae, but that I would probably be able to walk again in six months to one year. One year later I still cannot walk. I get it, that's life. There is no point getting upset. I just get on with things."

Kamel has been followed by Handicap International since he arrived at the Zaatari camp. "We gave him several mobility aids and a wheelchair, to help him get about," explains Farah, one of the organisation's physiotherapists. "We also see him on a regularly basis for physiotherapy sessions, with the aim of helping him get around independently." As the session draws to an end, Kamel admits, "I am very happy here in the camp, but of course if peace returns to Syria, we would all like to go back home. Not just me. You could come and visit us there if you want!"

 

Where your
support
helps

PRESS CONTACT

CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

Help them
concretely

To go further

Humanity & Inclusion continues its work in aid of Rohingya refugees during the Covid-19 epidemic
© Shumon Ahmed/HI
Emergency Health Protect vulnerable populations

Humanity & Inclusion continues its work in aid of Rohingya refugees during the Covid-19 epidemic

Jean-Loup Gouot, Director of Humanity & Inclusion (HI) in Bangladesh, tells us more about our work in aid of Rohingya refugees in the light of the Covid-19 epidemic.

 

Interview with Jean-Loup Gouot on the COVID-19 pandemic
© M. A. Islam / HI
Health Protect vulnerable populations Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees

Interview with Jean-Loup Gouot on the COVID-19 pandemic

Jean-Loup Gouot, Director of Humanity & Inclusion (HI) in Bangladesh, talks about the impact of COVID-19 in the country and outlines the risks of this epidemic, particularly for Rohingya refugees.

HI adapts its action to combat COVID-19 and protect the most vulnerable
© Quinn Neely / HI
Emergency Health Inclusion

HI adapts its action to combat COVID-19 and protect the most vulnerable

Our teams are making changes to the way they work in order to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in the field wherever possible. This includes reviewing their current response and implementing new projects to protect people from the virus and deal with the impact of the crisis, with a focus on people with disabilities, children, women, and isolated and older people.