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Preventing risks to save lives

Explosive weapons

Since the beginning of its emergency response in Iraq in 2014, Handicap International has conducted mine risk education activities in several of the country’s governorates. Improving the safety of internally displaced people, returnees and local populations is one of the organisation’s main goals in the region.  

Two brothers look at the leaflets left by Handicap International’s team, at the end of a session.

Two brothers look at the leaflets left by Handicap International’s team, at the end of a session. | © E.Fourt / Handicap International

When I was young, my family and I fled Baghdad. I was only six at the time, but I still remember it very clearly. We set off on foot and walked in line, one behind the other, for hours. Every time we drifted out of the line, my father would beg us to come back to the centre of the road, with a worried look on his face,” says Sarah, who manages the organisation’s mine risk education activities in Kirkuk, as she sets out on her daily round. “I was too young to understand why at the time. Now my job is to give that kind of advice to others.”

Every day, with her colleagues, she conducts sessions in homes and schools, to provide displaced people or people living in contaminated areas with information on the risk of mines and unexploded devices. After decades of war, Iraq is one of the most contaminated countries in the world, by conventional weapons and improvised devices. However, according to the organisation’s assessments, people are not aware of the risks related to these devices. That’s why the work done by Sarah and her team is essential: they make sure safety messages get through to people and, as a result, prevent the risk of injury or death.


At times, the beneficiaries are apprehensive of our presence. They ask us how a mine risk education session could improve their everyday life, explains Sarah. I always tell them that what we bring them is invisible, we come with a gift: the gift of life. It usually does not take more than one session for them to understand the vital aspect of our action…” In the first house Sarah and her colleagues visit, the team provides a session to a displaced family from the governorate of Salah Al Din. Having fled the Islamic State when the group arrived in their town, the family listens carefully to the pieces of advice given by Handicap International’s professionals. The father makes a couple of jokes to release the tension, but everyone seems to focus on what they are being told. They’re keen to understand how to respond to this danger and they are aware of how important the session is.

Every day, Sarah and her colleagues visit several families in neighbourhoods previously identified by Handicap International.

On that day, they also meet a father and ex-soldier, a victim of torture, and another family that has already bought a mine detector to use for when they will get back home. Each person’ story is unique, but they all have something in common. These people had to leave their home against their will and all of them are longing to return. “I understand them,” says Sarah. “I went through the same things as them. For most of my life, I’ve been a refugee in a neighbouring country or internally displaced in several governorates due to the conflicts in Iraq. It’s easy to lose hope under these circumstances. So, often, when I meet our beneficiaries, I share my story with them. I want them to know that it won’t go on forever, that they need to be patient, and that it’s not impossible to return to normality.”

Sarah’s commitment inspires the people she meets. She uses the sessions she conducts with the teams to guarantee them a more stable future, so that one day they can finally know the joy of returning home, in total safety.

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Completion of demining operations
Explosive weapons

Completion of demining operations

HI has completed its demining operations in the Tshopo, Ituri, Bas-Uele and Haut-Uele provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), launched in January 2016. Over a two-year period, HI and its local partner, AFRILAM (Africa for Anti-Mine Action) cleared 34,520 m2 of land of mines, the equivalent of 5 football pitches, benefiting the 5,600 inhabitants in the region.

Mine action in 2018
© Blaise Kormann/L’illustré/HI
Explosive weapons

Mine action in 2018

Developments in mine clearance largely reflect recent changes in response environments. Thomas Hugonnier, head of Mine Action at HI, explains how this currently affects our mine clearance operations.

Deir Ezzor: The fighting may be over but the danger is still present
© E.Fourt/HI
Explosive weapons

Deir Ezzor: The fighting may be over but the danger is still present

On 3 November 2017, the armed forces took back control of the town of Deir Ezzor in Syria.[1] The fighting inside and surrounding the city lasted several months, creating numerous civilian victims and displacing over 300,000 people. Handicap International (HI) is gravely concerned about the situation in the field. 


[1] Syrian armed forces, Syrian Democratic Forces (FDS) and coalition.