Go to main content
 
 

8 March - International Women's Day Women with disabilities almost ten times more likely to experience sexual violence

Prevention Rights
International

On 8 March, International Women's Day, HI is calling attention to the fact that more than one in three women experience violence in their lifetime. And women with disabilities are particularly at risk. HI aims at preventing violence and providing women with psychological and medical support.

Nancy, who participated in a psychosocial support activity in the DRC with HI

©Rosalie Colfs/HI

Thirty five percent[1] of women worldwide have experienced physical, emotional and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. This violence is a serious violation of their rights[2]. Women and girls with disabilities[3] are almost ten times more likely to experience sexual violence.
Because of social and cultural stereotypes, women do not always enjoy the right to a responsible, satisfying sexual life or to decide to have children when they want to. Moreover, women with disabilities, who are often very close to, or even dependent on, other adults in their immediate circle, are even more vulnerable. This violence causes many health problems, psychological trauma and social and economic exclusion.

For more than 25 years, HI has been implementing projects to combat violence around the world[4] including raising women's awareness of their rights and empowering them to make decisions. In Rwanda, HI has been providing psychological support to victims of physical and sexual violence and setting up discussion groups since 1994. In Rwanda, Burundi and Kenya, HI also works to combat sexual violence against children, including children with disabilities, who are three to four times more likely to be at risk of violence.

“Violence against women and girls with disabilities is invisible, poorly understood and largely ignored. These projects are essential to enable them to rebuild their lives, break out of their isolation and play a role in their community. Ending this violence is a priority,” explains Bénédicte de la Taille, HI's protection from violence expert.

Making It Work

HI works with disabled people’s organisations and feminist organisations as part of its Making it Work to increase the visibility of innovative best practices (training women, awareness-raising activities and so on) related to the protection of women's rights. The aim[5] of the organisation is also to ensure that women's voices are heard and that the risks they face (violence, abuse and exploitation) are taken into account in the projects implemented by numerous organisations (humanitarian, human rights and the fight against gender-based violence). Learn more: https://www.makingitwork-crpd.org

 

[2] And a major public health issue.

[3] Particularly women with a mental disability.

[4] Kenya, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Burundi, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

[5] Based on political advocacy.

Where your
support
helps

PRESS CONTACT

CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

Help them
concretely

To go further

COVID-19: “Leave no one behind”
© A. Surprenant/Collectif Item/HI
Inclusion Prevention

COVID-19: “Leave no one behind”

One of the poorest countries in the world and already confronted by one of its worst humanitarian crises, the Central African Republic must now face the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic. Humanity & Inclusion (HI)’s teams are working to ensure people with disabilities and vulnerable individuals at risk from exclusion are included in epidemic prevention actions.

HI’s race to protect frail people against COVID-19 in a country with only 24 ICU beds
© Dieter Telemans / HI
Emergency Health Prevention

HI’s race to protect frail people against COVID-19 in a country with only 24 ICU beds

In South Sudan’s Juba County, the Humanity & Inclusion (HI) team has identified more than 5,200 people with disabilities as well as very frail people who need support as the coronavirus makes its presence known. Vulnerable among the vulnerable, most are already displaced from their homes, and face numerous barriers to staying safe from COVID-19.

Albert, a father of five children, learns to protect his family from COVID-19
© HI
Health Inclusion Prevention

Albert, a father of five children, learns to protect his family from COVID-19

It is not easy to access information if you live in one of the world’s poorest countries. As the Covid-19 pandemic devastates communities around the globe, Humanity & Inclusion (HI) is showing vulnerable individuals, including people with disabilities, how to protect themselves from the virus.