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Bombing of a camp for the internally displaced

The aerial bombardment of a camp for internally displaced Syrians in Sarmada, near the Turkish border, caused at least 28 deaths and left more than 50 individuals wounded on Thursday, May 5.

© P. HOULIAT / HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL

Handicap International condemns this military operation and notes that indiscriminate or deliberate attacks against civilians constitute violations of international humanitarian law.  Explosive weapons are used in a massive way in populated areas of Syria with an appalling impact on civilians, who are the principal victims. The international community must act to end this practice, which causes heavy casualties on civilians, including in other conflict zones such as Yemen, Ukraine and Afghanistan.

When used in populated areas, explosive weapons kill, and create suffering and grave injuries (burns, open wounds, and fractures, for example).  They cause disabilities and significant psychological trauma.  They destroy homes and essential civilian infrastructure such as schools and hospitals, while creating forced displacement of the resident population.

The remains of explosive weapons that persist in impacted zones create a permanent threat to civilians long after the conflict has ended, making it impossible to remain living there or to return to these extremely dangerous places after an attack or the end of a conflict.

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"A rocket blew up not far from me"
© Ayman / HI
Explosive weapons Rehabilitation

"A rocket blew up not far from me"

Twelve-year-old Zakarya is the eighth child of a poor family who live in a small village in northern Yemen. His life changed dramatically when he was injured in a rocket attack and doctors had to amputate his left leg.

Before I had my children, I didn't think about my amputation
© O. Van de Broeck / HI
Explosive weapons Inclusion Rehabilitation

Before I had my children, I didn't think about my amputation

One day when he was back in Syria, Ibrahim heard gunfire close to where he was standing. He ran away in the opposite direction; right to the site where the bombs landed. Injured by a shrapnel wound to the leg, Ibrahim was transferred to Jordan where he was amputated. HI then fitted him with a prosthesis.

Our biggest expense: medicine
© O. Van de Broeck / HI
Inclusion Rehabilitation

Our biggest expense: medicine

At the start of the war in Syria, Hussein and his family left their home town to take refuge in Jordan. In the last few years, the head of the household has suffered from a series of medical complications. Thanks to HI's partnership with a local rehabilitation centre, the arthritis he suffers from in his knee is now managed by a team of physiotherapists.