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Bombing of a camp for the internally displaced

The aerial bombardment of a camp for internally displaced Syrians in Sarmada, near the Turkish border, caused at least 28 deaths and left more than 50 individuals wounded on Thursday, May 5.

 

Wounded in the spine by shrapnel during a bombing , is Dia'a suvi by a physiotherapist from Handicap International

Handicap International condemns this military operation and notes that indiscriminate or deliberate attacks against civilians constitute violations of international humanitarian law.  Explosive weapons are used in a massive way in populated areas of Syria with an appalling impact on civilians, who are the principal victims.  The international community must act to end this practice, which causes heavy casualties on civilians, including in other conflict zones such as Yemen, Ukraine and Afghanistan.

When used in populated areas, explosive weapons kill, and create suffering and grave injuries (burns, open wounds, and fractures, for example).  They cause disabilities and significant psychological trauma.  They destroy homes and essential civilian infrastructure such as schools and hospitals, while creating forced displacement of the resident population.

The remains of explosive weapons that persist in impacted zones create a permanent threat to civilians long after the conflict has ended, making it impossible to remain living there or to return to these extremely dangerous places after an attack or the end of a conflict.   

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© M. A. Islam / HI
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© Quinn Neely / HI
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