Go to main content

Fair ‘n Square: advancing the inclusion of people with disabilities

Inclusion
Mozambique

The latest version of the Fair ‘n Square website, which was first launched in 2015 by Handicap International (HI) in conjunction with UNICEF, looks at the ways in which children and adults with disabilities in Mozambique are discriminated against on a daily basis. Some people are unable to visit health centres because buildings are not designed for use by people with disabilities, for example, while some children with reduced mobility are unable to go to school because they don’t have the equipment they need to move around, such as a wheelchair. The aim of the website is therefore to raise awareness on disability, to show how some problems have easy solutions, and to provide information on action taken by HI in Mozambique to end the exclusion of people with disabilities.

©HI

Launched in 2015 in English and Portuguese, Fair’n square (a fair and equal world) features testimonies by Muzna, Filomena, Raúl, Ansha, Eduardinho and Ester - six children with disabilities who have benefited from HI’s support.

It also features an animated film explaining the problems encountered by children with disabilities and the support they need to improve their living conditions, along with an online game that gives visitors the opportunity to experience what it’s like to be excluded.

Identifying people with disabilities

Fair’n square also provides information on the actions taken by HI and UNICEF to improve the social inclusion of people with disabilities in Mozambique: “The first step is to identify people with disabilities, who often live in isolation. A child with disabilities may not automatically be enrolled in school, for example, or may find it hard to venture outside their home because their parents are either overprotective or ashamed of them. Meeting the child is the first step towards providing them with appropriate assistance,” explains Social Protection project manager, Ezequiel Mingane.

Guidance and information services - which include several mobile teams - currently identify children with disabilities in 35 districts of Maputo, Matola and Beira. These services will soon be available in Tete and Nampula. Particular attention is paid to children with disabilities.

Partnership with UNICEF

In partnership with UNICEF, Handicap International has implemented this project since 2012 to advance the social inclusion of people with disabilities and to improve their access to education, health, rehabilitation and psychosocial support services.

To date, around 9,000 people with disabilities have been identified, of whom a quarter are children. More than 10,000 families have been provided with information and involved in actions to end discrimination. Some 60 facilities have been adjusted to make public services accessible and 250 items of mobility equipment (crutches, wheelchairs, etc.) have been distributed to children with disabilities.

Where your
support
helps

PRESS CONTACT

CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

Help them
concretely

To go further

1/5 Syrian Refugees has disability
© Bas Bogaerts / HI
Inclusion Protect vulnerable populations

1/5 Syrian Refugees has disability

More than 60% of the Syrian refugee households include a person with disability, and 1/5 of refugees in Lebanon and Jordan have a disability, according to a new study by HI and iMMAP[1]. The survey ran from 2017-2018, and so far has resulted in two reports, four factsheets and a Data Dashboard that provide statistical figures on people with disabilities among Syrian refugees and their access to humanitarian aid. HI Regional Inclusion Technical Coordinator Yahoko Asai explains the study’s importance:

 

[1] IMMAP is an international NGO that provides professional information management services to humanitarian and development organizations by collecting, analyzing, and visualizing data, which enables them to make informed decisions to ultimately provide high-quality targeted assistance to the world’s most vulnerable populations.

A bright future for Layian
© Abed Al-Rahman Sayma/HI
Inclusion

A bright future for Layian

Layian Ramzy Dokhan is a nine-year-old girl who has lived with a physical disability since she was three. She lives in Rafah, a city close to the Egyptian border, which is prone to military incursions. Nine of Layian’s family members, including three of her brothers and two of her sisters, live in a house with cramped rooms. When it was time for Layian to attend school, she was denied enrollment due to her disability. That is, until she met Humanity & Inclusion (HI).

Adapting humanitarian services to people with disabilities in Bentiu camp
© Till Mayer / HI
Inclusion

Adapting humanitarian services to people with disabilities in Bentiu camp

A report recently published by HI and IOM[1] offers an assessment of the situation in the Bentiu Protection of Civilians (POC) Site in South Sudan, where people with disabilities live in difficult conditions and humanitarian services struggle to meet their needs. The report makes a number of recommendations.


[1] IOM = International Organization for Migration