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Giving a voice to Syrians

Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees

In January 2017, French photographer Philippe de Poulpiquet spent two weeks with Handicap International’s teams in Jordan and Lebanon. Every day, they went out to visit Syrian refugees, including numerous victims of explosive weapons.

"Bombed" exhibition | © Handicap International

« Bombed » exhibition

This exhibition, supported by ECHO (the European Commission’s Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations) gives a voice to these civilians, whose lives were turned upside down in a few short moments. Their stories reflect a terrible reality shared by hundreds of thousands of Syrians since the beginning of the war in 2011.

Here is the online exhibition


Sondos is 8 years old and comes from the Ghouta, in the suburbs of Damascus. A few months ago, she was the victim of a bombing with her family. Still very marked by this event and now refugee with her parents in Lebanon, she is accompanied by a team of Handicap International that gives her psychological support sessions.




Molham was just 9 years old when he was wounded by a stray bullet in Homs, Syria. In 2014, her family fled the fighting in the country and took refuge in Jordan. Handicap International accompanies the young boy with physiotherapy sessions and psychosocial support since his arrival in the country.




Hussein is 15 years old. At the end of 2016, he was injured during the bombing of Idlib, in Syria, in which half of his family was killed. He had one leg amputated and took refuge in Lebanon where he received support from Handicap International. “I don't think about the future, I don't have one...”





Khaled was just one year old when he lost his leg in a bombing raid in Syria. He also tragically lost both of his parents that day. He now lives with his aunt as refugees in Lebanon. Since he arrived in the country, Handicap International has provided the little boy with psychological support sessions.






Hozeifa was injured in 2016, during the bombing of Idlib in Syria. He is now paraplegic and lives in a tent with the rest of his family in Lebanon, where they have taken refuge. Handicap International is helping him to adapt to his new circumstances by providing psychological support and physiotherapy.




Mayada, 48 years old, is from the suburbs of Damascus in Syria. In 2014, her house was bombed. As a result of her injuries, her leg had to be amputated. She has been living as a refugee in Lebanon for two years and has been fitted with a prosthesis by Handicap International which monitors her progress through regular physiotherapy sessions.


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Airstrikes kill civilians
© William Daniels/HI

Airstrikes kill civilians

According to the latest report from the Association On Armed Violence(AOAV), 15,399 civilians were killed by explosive weapons during the first 11 months of 2017 - a 42% increase compared to the same period in 2016. This sharp rise is largely down to a massive increase in deadly airstrikes.

Deir Ezzor: The fighting may be over but the danger is still present
© E.Fourt/HI
Explosive weapons

Deir Ezzor: The fighting may be over but the danger is still present

On 3 November 2017, the armed forces took back control of the town of Deir Ezzor in Syria.[1] The fighting inside and surrounding the city lasted several months, creating numerous civilian victims and displacing over 300,000 people. Handicap International (HI) is gravely concerned about the situation in the field. 


[1] Syrian armed forces, Syrian Democratic Forces (FDS) and coalition.  

Aerial bombing has devastating consequences for civilians
© Elias Saade / HI
Explosive weapons

Aerial bombing has devastating consequences for civilians

In 2016, a record number of civilians were killed in bombing raids in Syria. One in every four civilians killed by aerial bombing in urban areas was under 18 years old, according to a study published by Lancet Global Health based on a Violence Documentation Centre (VDC) dataset. The study points to the use of explosive weapons in populated areas - a practice Handicap International (HI) vigorously campaigns against - and its devastating effects on civilians as the cause of these figures.