Go to main content

HI helps anti-personnel victim Ismail live with dignity again

Explosive weapons Inclusion Rehabilitation
Lebanon

Ismail lost both legs in a landmine explosion at the age of 14. Humanity & Inclusion (HI) is now teaching him to walk again with his new prostheses.

Ismail is pleased with his new prostheses

Ismail is pleased with his new prostheses | © HI

Injured by an anti-personnel mine in 2014, Ismael had to have both legs amputated above the knee. The accident turned his life upside down and left him feeling excluded. Without adapted prostheses, he is reliant on others and unable to do routine activities.

Now 17, Ismail grew out of his last pair of prostheses, which became too small for him and he needed new ones.

“Because Ismail’s prostheses were too small, they were uncomfortable and could have caused him complications, preventing him from moving around unaided,"

explains HI physiotherapist Rana Al Adbel.

HI's rehabilitation teams assessed his physical condition and supplied him with new prostheses adapted to his size, allowing him to continue walking and living normally.

Living with dignity

Ismail lives with his parents and five siblings aged five to twenty-seven in a very isolated and inaccessible rural area.

They have been directly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic because they can no longer afford to buy essential items, such as food.

As the situation is still unstable and dangerous in his home region, Ismail does not wish to return to live in Syria.

He prefers to take a training course and find a stable job.

"I want to earn enough money for my family to live with dignity,"

he says.

Where your
support
helps

PRESS CONTACT

CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

Help them
concretely

To go further

Education, girls, disability: HI committed to solve the equation of exclusion
© Pascale Jérôme Kantoussan/HI
Inclusion Rights

Education, girls, disability: HI committed to solve the equation of exclusion

Following a study conducted in 2019 in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger, and at the occasion of the International Day of Education on January 24, Humanity & Inclusion (HI) alerts Sahel countries’ governments and international cooperation organisations on the exclusion of girls with disabilities from school. Worldwide, women with disabilities are three times more likely to be illiterate than men without disabilities.

Haitian earthquake victim Moïse is back on the football pitch
© Davide Preti/HI
Emergency Rehabilitation

Haitian earthquake victim Moïse is back on the football pitch

Moïse, 15, lost his leg in 2010, when Haiti was struck by a powerful earthquake. With support from Humanity & Inclusion (HI), he has now been fitted with a prosthesis and benefits from regular adjustments.

Haiti: 11 years on, HI continues to ensure access to rehabilitation services for the most vulnerable
© Nadia Todres/HI
Emergency Rehabilitation

Haiti: 11 years on, HI continues to ensure access to rehabilitation services for the most vulnerable

After Haiti was hit by an earthquake on 12 January 2010, Humanity & Inclusion (HI) launched one the biggest emergency responses in its history. The organisation continues to provide support to the most vulnerable people today.

*
*
*

(format: nom@fournisseur.com)

*
*
VALIDATE