Go to main content

“I need to show a good example and reassure the company that it’s on the right track”

Inclusion
Senegal

Aminatou sent out application after application. But despite holding a vocational training certificate in accountancy, she found it hard to find a job because of her physical disability. For nearly ten years, she worked as a sales assistant in her local neighbourhood while giving up her time to help disabled people’s organisations.

Aminatou, an employee at Dakar Dem Dikk thanks to the EMPHAS project | © HI

In 2016, with support from HI, Aminatou applied for a job with Dakar Dem Dikk (DDD), the company that operates the bus network in the Senegal capital, and which had already worked with the organisation to promote the recruitment of people with disabilities. “My colleagues made it easier for me when I started at DDD. They’re really understanding. The project team helped too, because they prepared for my arrival. All the same, DDD offered us training before we started, which helped us understand our job and gave us the tools to do it.”

But Aminatou still needs to adapt to the pace of life at work, which is new to her:

“The only hard part is having sit for long hours on the road in the conductor’s cabin. I think it’s just because it’s the start and I’ll get used to the pace soon. I’m among the first people with disabilities recruited by DDD, so I need to show a good example and reassure the company that it’s on the right track.”

HI and inclusive employment in Senegal:

Since 2014, HI has promoted the inclusive employment of people with disabilities through the EMPHAS project[1]. The organisation starts by arranging an interview with a social worker and a recruitment advisor for the person with disabilities. After a skills assessment, it then draws up an action plan with the person in question, based on their aspirations and needs, to ensure they receive tailored assistance, which includes training, internships and awareness-raising for potential employers.

HI works with a local network of more than 90 employers and around a dozen bodies active in the field of employment and training. The organisation helps partner businesses adapt the workplace to make it accessible to people with disabilities. It also raises the awareness of other staff members to better integrate disabled employees. Lastly, it monitors people who have found employment through its programme to ensure that everything is going well in their new work environment.

 

 

[1] EMPHAS: Employment for People with Disabilities in Senegal

Where your
support
helps

PRESS CONTACT

CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

Help them
concretely

To go further

1/5 Syrian Refugees has disability
© Bas Bogaerts / HI
Inclusion Protect vulnerable populations

1/5 Syrian Refugees has disability

More than 60% of the Syrian refugee households include a person with disability, and 1/5 of refugees in Lebanon and Jordan have a disability, according to a new study by HI and iMMAP[1]. The survey ran from 2017-2018, and so far has resulted in two reports, four factsheets and a Data Dashboard that provide statistical figures on people with disabilities among Syrian refugees and their access to humanitarian aid. HI Regional Inclusion Technical Coordinator Yahoko Asai explains the study’s importance:

 

[1] IMMAP is an international NGO that provides professional information management services to humanitarian and development organizations by collecting, analyzing, and visualizing data, which enables them to make informed decisions to ultimately provide high-quality targeted assistance to the world’s most vulnerable populations.

A bright future for Layian
© Abed Al-Rahman Sayma/HI
Inclusion

A bright future for Layian

Layian Ramzy Dokhan is a nine-year-old girl who has lived with a physical disability since she was three. She lives in Rafah, a city close to the Egyptian border, which is prone to military incursions. Nine of Layian’s family members, including three of her brothers and two of her sisters, live in a house with cramped rooms. When it was time for Layian to attend school, she was denied enrollment due to her disability. That is, until she met Humanity & Inclusion (HI).

Adapting humanitarian services to people with disabilities in Bentiu camp
© Till Mayer / HI
Inclusion

Adapting humanitarian services to people with disabilities in Bentiu camp

A report recently published by HI and IOM[1] offers an assessment of the situation in the Bentiu Protection of Civilians (POC) Site in South Sudan, where people with disabilities live in difficult conditions and humanitarian services struggle to meet their needs. The report makes a number of recommendations.


[1] IOM = International Organization for Migration