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Idleb - The risk of a humanitarian disaster

Emergency
Syria

While a major military offensive on Idleb region is possibly under preparation, HI calls on parties to the conflict to spare civilians and allow full and unfettered humanitarian access.

While a major military offensive on Idleb region is possibly under preparation, HI calls on parties to the conflict to spare civilians and allow full and unfettered humanitarian access.  The number of Syrians forcibly displaced into Idleb from other areas in Syria has brought the population in this small pocket of the country up to 3.9 million people. Many civilians who have been displaced into Idleb have already endured intense bombing and offensives in Eastern Ghouta, Northern Rural Homs and South Syria in recent months. Displaced persons struggle to find adequate, affordable accommodation, and many live in overcrowded camps or informal settlements without any protection from airstrikes, no sanitation, no clean drinking water and a lack of basic services. Humanitarian personnel and particularly medical facilities provide crucial services for the population at this time and must be protected, and allowed to function. Moderate estimates are that at least 500,000 people will be forced to flee should an offensive be launched.

HI appeals to the international community to use its influence to urge parties to the conflict to stop bombing civilians and avoid a military offensive that would have deadly consequences for civilians. It is imperative that the international community support continued, coordinated humanitarian access to populations in need via the most direct routes.  

Jean-Pierre Delomier, Humanitarian Action Director  

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