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Mastercard Foundation partners with HI to help refugees in Kenya

Inclusion Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees
Kenya

Covid-19 has hit the world, but its impact has been felt most acutely by those in vulnerable situations. Kenya has not escaped the pandemic and its refugee populations in the Dadaap and Kakuma camps have had to show resilience to overcome the new challenges that have emerged.

Kassim Mohammed, 14, is a Somali refugee living in Dagahaley camp in Daadab, Kenya.

Kassim Mohammed, 14, is a Somali refugee living in Dagahaley camp in Daadab, Kenya. | © Humanity & Inclusion

Back to school despite the pandemic

Through the Mastercard Foundation's Covid-19 Recovery and Resilience Program, Humanity & Inclusion was able to significantly expand access to online learning and training for refugees and host communities to enable children and youth to continue their education during school closures, and build digital learning capacity to support better learning and teaching once schools reopen.
This project has a strong focus on children with disabilities and the development of specific interventions that address their unique learning needs.

Finding a job in difficult conditions

The crisis has led to the temporary or permanent closure of most micro, small and medium-sized businesses, resulting in massive job losses. With the support of the Mastercard Foundation, Humanity & Inclusion was also able to put in place measures to help business owners, especially those living with disabilities, adapt their business practices to the market disruption resulting from the pandemic.

Mastercard Foundation COVID-19 Recovery and Resilience Program

The Mastercard Foundation COVID-19 Recovery and Resilience Program has two main goals. First, to deliver emergency support for health workers, first responders, and students. Second, to strengthen the diverse institutions that are the first line of defense against the social and economic aftermath of this disease. These include universities, financial service providers, businesses, technology start-ups, incubators, government agencies, youth organizations, and nongovernmental organizations.

For more on the Mastercard Foundation COVID-19 Recovery and Resilience Program, please visit their website.

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CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

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To go further

Hope at Last: Malyun's Story in Kenya
© Humanity & Inclusion
Inclusion Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees

Hope at Last: Malyun's Story in Kenya

Malyun, now 18, grew up in Somalia. At the age of five, she was playing with her friends in a field near her home when she swallowed an unknown metal fragment. She immediately fell to the ground. When her father came to her aid, he tried to hold her hand to make her stand, but her legs would not hold. The family sought medical treatment in Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, but all treatments failed. They were then sent to Kenya for further specialist treatment. It was on arrival at the hospital that Malyun was diagnosed with lower limb paralysis.

Accessing education, against all odds
© Humanity & Inclusion
Inclusion Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees

Accessing education, against all odds

Kassim Mohammed, 14, is a Somali refugee living in Dagahaley camp in Daadab, Kenya. His daily life is not always easy, but Kassim also faces a different situation from other refugees his age, as he is visually impaired and has a disability in one leg! Despite this, Kassim shows determination and goes to school every day, where he is now in grade 7.

Living with paralysis, Imani opens store in refugee camp
© Humanity & Inclusion
Inclusion Supporting the Displaced Populations/Refugees

Living with paralysis, Imani opens store in refugee camp

Imani, 29, lives with her mother and five siblings in Kakuma refugee camp in northern Kenya. Originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, she had to flee the country because of numerous raids against her tribe. Unfortunately, during her journey she was involved in a traffic accident that caused a spinal cord injury, paralyzing both her legs.