Go to main content
 
 

“This will allow me to continue moving forward, until better times”

Inclusion
Jordan

Naayem is 35. In 2013, she fled the conflict in Syria with her family and took refuge in Jordan. After having her leg amputated as a young girl, she now benefits from the support of Handicap International (HI), which has fitted her with a new prosthesis.

Aya takes Naayem’s measurements. | © Elisa Fourt / HI

The Handicap International (HI) centre in Mafraq is crowded with patients. Dozens of women, men and children are waiting patiently for their consultation. Everyone is here for the same reason: the organisation’s second prosthesis and orthosis workshop of the month. Some have come to try on their new prosthesis, while others are going to have their measurements taken for an orthopaedic device or a new pair of medical shoes. But one young woman stands out from the rest. In fact, Naayem is impossible to miss. It isn’t her artificial leg, visible under her long dress that first catches your eye - it’s her infectious smile and welcoming eyes. If the 35-year-old Syrian doesn’t look as anxious as the other patients, it’s because she’s used to this kind of situation. “I lost my leg nearly three decades ago and I’ve changed prosthesis many times over the years. For me, it’s sort of routine now,” she says.

When Naayem was a still a child, back in Syria, she was involved in a serious accident. One day, she was playing outside her home when a water tank fell on top of her. “They rushed me to hospital. I was there for a month. The doctors had to amputate my leg to save my life. I was really young – it didn’t take me long to get used to my prosthesis. I was still growing, they changed it roughly every year.”

Naayem had no problems accessing care before the war. “In 2013, I decided to flee with my husband and children. We got in our car and just drove to Jordan. We didn’t want to live in the middle of the fighting – it was getting worse every year.” Naayem ended up in Zaatari refugee camp with her family, where she was given information on services available in the country. “Your organisation was on the list. I got in touch with you because my prosthesis was in a bad state and I couldn’t walk properly anymore. Your team took my measurements and quickly fitted me with a new one.”

Four years later, Naayem left the camp and moved to the city of Mafraq. Her prosthesis needs to be changed again, which is why she has returned to the workshop today. “I’m waiting for them to take my measurements,” she says patiently. When her turn comes, Aya, an orthopaedic-fitting specialist, greets her with a broad smile. She examines Naayem’s leg and prepares the mould for her new prosthesis.

Naayem will need to wait several weeks before she gets her new prosthesis. As a mother of six children, it will make her life easier, she says. Her daughter has come with her to the workshop and, after thanking the organisation’s team, Naayem takes her hand before heading back to the modest shelter she shares with the rest of her family, near the Syrian border. After nearly seven years of conflict, she doesn’t know if she’ll ever go back to her country. “Whether it’s here or there, we have nothing left. To be honest, it’s really hard to think about the future. But at least with my new leg I can keep moving forward, until better times,” she says before leaving the centre
.

Where your
support
helps

PRESS CONTACT

CANADA

Gabriel PERRIAU

USA

Mica BEVINGTON

 

Help them
concretely

To go further

Girls education challende in Sierra Leone
© HI
Inclusion

Girls education challende in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's female literacy rate (34%) is one of the lowest in the world and, although there are many policies, none specifically addresses children with disabilities, with the exception of the Children's Rights Act (2007) which guarantees every child access to education. To address this situation, HI is implementing the Girl's Education Challenge - Transition (GEC-T) project, with key partners, so that girls and marginalized children with disabilities in five districts of Sierra Leone can reach their full potential and make the transition from primary school to secondary school and beyond.

 

UN Security Council recognises the rights of people with disabilities in armed conflicts
© Martin Crep/HI
Emergency Inclusion Rights

UN Security Council recognises the rights of people with disabilities in armed conflicts

For the first time ever, the United Nations Security Council has adopted a Resolution on persons with disabilities in armed conflict. This represents a significant step forward for people with disabilities, who are particularly at risk in crisis situations and often overlooked in humanitarian assistance.

Humanity & Inclusion will be at the Women Deliver 2019 Conference
Unsplash
Inclusion

Humanity & Inclusion will be at the Women Deliver 2019 Conference

Starting June 3, Humanity & Inclusion will have a presence at the Women Deliver 2019 Conference, which gathers more than 6,000 people every three years, and this year meets in Vancouver, Canada. This year’s conference focuses on “power, and how it can drive – or hinder – progress and change.”