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Inclusive education in West Africa: first step towards the inclusion of children with disabilities

Inclusion
Togo

Since 2012, Handicap International has been improving the school enrolment and attendance of 170,000 children with disabilities in nine West African countries through the “Promoting the Full Participation of Children with Disabilities in Education” (APPEHL) project. Sandra Boisseau, who coordinates APPEHL from Dakar, Senegal, explains what the organisation is doing to remove obstacles to education for these children.

Bénédicte Leguezim is visually impared. She is 12 years old and studies in 5th grade in Loma Kolide.

Bénédicte Leguezim is visually impared. She is 12 years old and studies in 5th grade in Loma Kolide. | © Studio Cabrelli / Handicap International

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Nepal earthquake: inseparable Nirmala and Khendo
© Elise cartuyvels/HI

Nepal earthquake: inseparable Nirmala and Khendo

On 25 April 2015, Nepal was hit by a violent earthquake. Hundreds of kilometres apart, Nirmala and Khendo were both buried under the rubble. Rushed to hospital, they each had a leg amputated. This is where they met, attended rehabilitation sessions with HI’s physiotherapists, and learned to walk. Three years on, they are almost never apart and even go to school together. Their dream? To dance again.

Three years after the earthquake: HI continues to assist victims
© Prasiit Sthapit/HI

Three years after the earthquake: HI continues to assist victims

More than 8,000 people were killed and 22,000 injured when an earthquake hit Nepal three years ago. Already present in the field, HI launched an immediate response in aid of those affected, providing assistance to more than 15,000 people.

Investing in Maternal and Child Health in Togo
© HI

Investing in Maternal and Child Health in Togo

HI is improving health facilities for pregnant women and newborns in the maritime region of Togo. Thanks to these interventions, neonatal mortality is expected to fall by 20% by the end of 2019.