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Yemen: Acute and urgent needs


After two years of war, violence is part of daily life in Yemen. Handicap International is therefore providing support to rehabilitation departments in three health centres in Sana’a, where it has already assisted more than 4,500 people since August 2015.

Injured after a bombing on her hometown, this young woman was supported by Handicap International through the provision of an assistive device and psychosocial support sessions.

© Handicap International

Handicap International provides rehabilitation care in a specialist centre and rehabilitation departments in two hospitals in the Yemeni capital. An average of 250 people a month benefit from Handicap International’s support. Since the start of the conflict in March 2015, there has been an increase in demand for rehabilitation services, already in short supply in Yemen, and a decrease in supply.

To address this situation, the organisation has trained 235 medical staff and helps case-manage patients. Over the last 18 months, it has donated nearly 7,000 items of equipment such as wheelchairs and crutches, and provides medical staff with consultation tables and other supplies.



Civilians traumatised by violence

The organisation has also provided 4,500 people with psychological support. People who are injured in explosions and crossfire or witness the death of a relative are often traumatised by their experiences. Many suffer stress, depression or shock.

Handicap International organises one-to-one and group discussion sessions to help people overcome their problems. Talking through trauma or day-to-day problems and forging links with people with similar experiences can help them rebuild their lives.

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Airstrikes kill civilians
© William Daniels/HI

Airstrikes kill civilians

According to the latest report from the Association On Armed Violence(AOAV), 15,399 civilians were killed by explosive weapons during the first 11 months of 2017 - a 42% increase compared to the same period in 2016. This sharp rise is largely down to a massive increase in deadly airstrikes.

Sanaa: situation to deteriorate rapidly if blockade not lifted
© Camille Gillardeau / HI

Sanaa: situation to deteriorate rapidly if blockade not lifted

HI works in five health centres and hospitals in Sanaa, the capital of Yemen, where it provides rehabilitation care and distributes mobility aids (crutches, wheelchairs), among other activities. The impact on the population and humanitarian operations is likely worsen rapidly if the blockade imposed on 6 November is not lifted. François Olive-Keravec, Yemen programme director at Handicap International (HI), who is currently in Sanaa, describes the situation in the field.

Psychological support for parents and children living in a refugee camp
© Muhammad Azharul Islam / HI

Psychological support for parents and children living in a refugee camp

Ayesha Begum is 22 years old. In early September, she took refuge in Bangladesh where, with her three children, she joined her brothers in a temporary shelter on the edge of Kutupalong camp. Her husband is dead. She takes part in a parents’ club organised by HI, which provides psychosocial support to mothers living as refugees.