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“I don’t want to be afraid anymore” Attalah, 50

Explosive weapons Prevention
Syria

Abdurrahman, 50, is from south Syria. A few years ago, he was working with his son when they were caught in an explosion. Abdel Aziz, one of his eight children, had to have his leg amputated as a result of the accident. Today, Handicap International’s local partner is visiting Abdel Aziz to provide him with physiotherapy. Handicap International’s partner is also taking advantage of this opportunity to provide the family with a risk education session. Handicap International’s actions in Syria are implemented with the support of the EU’s humanitarian aid and civil protection service (ECHO).

Attallah and his children at the end of their risk education session.

Attallah and his children at the end of their risk education session. | © Handicap International

Today, Handicap International’s local partner is visiting Attallah. The syrian man welcomes the risk education specialists into his home and, soon after, his children come and sit next to them in the living room. The team is going to help Attallah and his family identify dangerous weapons, in order to prevent accidents. There are a lot of mines and explosive remnants of war in their region, so it’s important everyone knows the risks of these weapons.

This session is extremely important for Attallah. A few years ago, his son Abdel Aziz had to have his leg amputated after being caught in an explosion. His father wants to make sure it doesn’t happen to any of his other children. A few weeks ago, Handicap International’s local partner was going from door to door, identifying people with injuries, when they came across Attallah, who told them about Abdel Aziz’s accident. Since then, his son is taking part in physiotherapy sessions at a rehabilitation centre close to their home. He will soon be fitted with an artificial limb which will allow him to walk again. When they met him, the organisation’s professionals also suggested Attallah’s family take part in a mine risk education session at home.  

“The organisation’s sessions are really helpful,” explains Attallah. “My children can finally identify dangerous objects.” As the risk education session draws to a close, Attallah shares his concern with the team: “I don’t want to be afraid anymore. I don’t want to be afraid of these weapons, or that the conflict will take a new turn or that my children are going to get hurt.” Since the start of its emergency response, Handicap International has helped more than 350,000 people learn more about the risks posed by explosive remnants of war in Syria and in neighbouring countries affected by the crisis.

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